The Bridge Hotel

  • Wheatley Bridge Hotel and tea gardens 1920s
  • Wheatley Bridge Hotel and tea gardens 1920s
  • Wheatley Bridge Hotel and tea gardens 1920s
  • Wheatley Bridge Hotel and tea gardens 
Postcard front, probably from the 1910s
  • Wheatley Bridge Hotel and tea gardens Postcard back, probably from the 1910s (postage for a postcard was 1/2d, until 1918)
  • Wheatley Bridge Hotel and tea gardens 1920s
  • Wheatley Bridge Hotel and tea gardens 1920s
  • Wheatley Bridge Hotel and tea gardens Postcard 1910s
  • Wheatley Bridge Hotel and tea gardens Postcard 1910s
  • Wheatley Bridge Hotel and tea gardens Bankruptcy notice in 1926
  • Wooden hut at Wheatley Bridge Hotel and tea gardens
  • Failed drink licence application 1926
see also pdf extract
Archive Notes:

The Bridge Hotel. Photos from a 1920s brochure. Postcard, front and back, probably from the 1910s (postage for a postcard was 1/2d, until 1918) with a list of amenities on the reverse. Currently Harvester Restaurant (2018)

According to her great-great grandson, Fanny Cordelia Mutton was a Hotel Manageress of a few different Hotels including the Bridge Hotel, Wheatley in 1926. she had married Joseph Henry Pleming; at some point they separated and Fanny took up with an Arthur John Foster and they seemed to go as man & wife for some years although never actually married. In February 1926, they made an application for a liquour licence but this was refused. Fanny was the proprietress who filed for bankruptcy of the Bridge Hotel at the end of 1926. The write-up on bankruptcy and the claim against the council suggests that Fanny Foster (as she called herself) had no business experience, had over-paid for the property (taking account of the mortgages on it) and was under-capitalised, In desperation, the creditors made a claim against Oxfordshire Council, but it was regarded as laughable.

Also, according to the same informant, his grandmother's aunt & uncle, Lily & Walter Balding, lived in a wooden hut on the river at Wheatley, shown in one of the photos.

At some time it became a night club just called 'The Bridge', the name later changed to 'Fingles', Drinkers from the King & Queen would go on to this. G R Nixey owned this at some stage and, reportedly sold the land on which the supermarket was developed.

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